HERITAGE > Pre-War Fords

 

The first car built by the Ford Motor Company of Canada in early 1904 was the Model C. A total of 117 cars were made in the first year. Most were 2-cylinder Model C's but a few 4-cylinder Model B's were also built. Both were made in 1905 along with the Model F, a new 2-cylinder car.

 

In 1906, both the C and B were discontinued, but two new models came on the scene. The Model N was a low-priced 4-cylinder car, but the 406 cid 6-cylinder Model K was huge and expensive.

 

The F was gone by 1907, but there were two new Fords--Model R and Model S. Both were 4-cylinder cars, and built along with the Model N and Model K through much of 1908.

 

Production of all those models ceased when the Model T made its debut in October 1908. The Canadian-made Fords were similar to the American models, although there may have been minor departures due to the use of Canadian components. Ford of Canada constantly tried to keep a high level of Canadian content.

 

During the Model T era, Ford of Canada chose not to produce some body types. For instance, sometimes there were no Canadian 2- door Model T sedans. Four-door Model T sedans were made in Canada before they were in the U.S. Four doors were convenient for people going from province to province where right and left drive laws varied.

 

Some body types were sold under different names. When the American T Runabout was called a Roadster in 1923, Ford of Canada continued calling it a Runabout.

 

It was also in 1923, when Ford called the 2-door sedan a Tudor. Ford of Canada adopted the same name for it, and even went further and called the 4-door sedan a Fordor. Ford used that term for many years, but it originated in Canada and used for five years before it was in the States.

 

The arrival of the Model A brought a much greater variety of body types, though Ford of Canada never produced quite all the body styles made south of the border. Model A station wagons, for instance, were never made in Canada.

 

Ford's famous V-8 was introduced in mid 1932, simultaneously in both countries. Ford of Canada dropped 4-cylinder cars in 1933, while they were on the market a year longer in the U.S.

 

The northern firm produced some body types not made in the States. From 1929 through 1936, Rumble Seat models were available in more varieties for Canadians than Americans.

 

Also for 1936, all Canadian-built Tudors had trunks, while this was not always true in the States. In addition, Canadians were treated to the Special DeLuxe, a top-line series of 10 models above the DeLuxe.

 

The little 134 cid 60 hp V-8 appeared in both countries in 1937. It was an economical alternative to the regular V-8. But, Ford of Canada stopped offering it in the 1939 lineup. It continued to be available in the U.S. until the 1941 models arrived.

 

Ford's first 6-cylinder car since the Model K made its debut in the 1941 models. Buyers could choose it or the V-8, but only in the States. Not until many years later did Ford of Canada offer a 6-cylinder engine.

 

The 1941 Fords in both countries came in three series: Special, DeLuxe and Super DeLuxe. There were only two series for 1942, but not the same two in both countries. Ford of Canada kept the entry-level Special and deleted the Super DeLuxe. In contrast, Ford in the States deleted the Special and kept the top-line Super DeLuxe.

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